yellow Labrador

The Modern Labrador

The history of the faithfull Labrador Retriever

The modern Labrador’s ancestors originated on the island of Newfoundland, now part of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

yellow Labrador

The founding breed of the Labrador was the St Johns Water Dog, a breed that emerged through ad-hoc breedings by early settlers of the island in the 16th century. The forebears of the St. John’s Dog are not known, but were likely a random-bred mix of English, Irish, and Portuguese working breeds. The Newfoundland (known then as the Greater Newfoundland) is likely a result of the St. John’s Dog breeding with mastiffs brought to the island by the generations of Portuguese fishermen who had been fishing offshore since the 16th century.

The smaller short-coated St. John’s Dog (also known then as the Lesser Newfoundland) was used for retrieval and pulling in nets from the water. These smaller dogs were the forebears of the Labrador Retriever. The white chest, feet, chin, and muzzle – known as tuxedo markings – characteristic of the St. John’s Dog often appear in modern Labrador and will occasionally manifest in Labradors as a small white spot on the chest or stray white hairs on the feet or muzzle.

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The St Johns area of Newfoundland was settled mainly by the English and Irish. Local fishermen originally used the St. John’s dog to assist in carrying ropes between boats, towing dories, and helping to retrieve fishnets in the water. The Labrador’s loyalty and hard working behaviour were valuable assets for fishermen.

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A number of St. John’s Dogs were brought back to England in the early 19th century,Poole was then the hub of the Newfoundland fishing trade, by the gentry, and became prized as sporting and water fowl dogs. A few kennels breeding these grew up in England; at the same time a combination of live stock protection policy in Newfoundland and quarantine laws in England led to their gradual demise their country of origin.

The first Earl of Malmesbury, who bred for duck shooting on his estate, and the 5th and 6th Dukes of Buccleuch, and youngest son Lord George William Montagu-Douglas-Scott, were instrumental in developing and establishing the modern Labrador in19th century England. The dogs Avon (“Buccleuch Avon”) and Ned given by Malmesbury to assist the Duke of Buccleuch’s breeding program in the 1880s are considered the ancestors of modern Labradors.

Black Labrador

The first St. John’s dog was said to be brought to England around 1820; however, the breed’s reputation had spread to England long before. There is a story that the Earl of Malmesbury saw a St. John’s Dog on a fishing boat and immediately made arrangements with traders to have some of these dogs exported to England.

These ancestors of the first labradors so impressed the Earl with their skill and ability for retrieving anything within the water and on shore that he devoted his entire kennel to developing and stabilising the breed. (Wikipedia reference)

 

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